Ekalavya practicing having Drona's statue

Mahabharata – Ekalavya

Ekalavya – The great disciple

There cannot be a better example of a shishya than Ekalavya. Here we have a person, who learnt archery on his own after denied by his Guru and then given it all when his Guru asked for. This is a supreme example of self sacrifice, another example of greatness where the person did not hesitate to forgo his sole aim in life to save his principles. Another example is Karna.

Drona, Arjuna and Ekalavya

Ekalavya is a young prince of the Nishadha tribes, and a member of a low caste, who nevertheless aspires to study archery in the gurukul of Dronacharya. After being rejected by Drona, Ekalavya embarks upon a program of self-study in the presence of a clay image of Drona. He achieves a level of skill equal to that of Arjuna, Drona’s favorite and most accomplished pupil. Fearful that he will excel him, Arjuna begs Drona to take action. Drona goes to Ekalavya and demands that Ekalavya turn over his right thumb as a teacher’s fee. The loyal disciple cripples himself, and thereby ruins his prospects as an archer, by severing his thumb and giving it to Drona.

In the Mahabharata, he is introduced as a young prince of the lowly Nishadha tribes. He was born to Devashrava (brother of Vasudeva, who was father of Krishna) and was raised by Hiranyadhanus, the leader (King) of the Nishadhas, who was a commander in the army of Jarasandha (the king of Magadha).

Learning archery


Desirous of learning advanced skills of archery, he seeks the tutelage of Drona, the legendary weaponsmaster of and instructor of Arjuna and his brothers. Drona, however, rejects Ekalavya on account of the prince’s humble origins. He is undeterred and goes off into the forest where he fashions a clay image of Drona. Worshipping the statue as his preceptor, he begins a disciplined program of self-study. As a result, he becomes an archer of exceptional prowess, superior even to Drona’s best pupil, Arjuna. One day while he is practicing, hears a dog barking. Before the dog can shut up or get out of the way, Ekalavya fires seven arrows in rapid succession to fill the dog’s mouth without injuring it.

Ekalavya and dog

Ekalavya and dog

The Pandava princes come upon the “stuffed” dog, and wonder who could have pulled off such a feat of archery. Searching the forest, they find a dark-skinned man dressed all in black, his body besmeared with filth and his hair in matted locks. It is Ekalavya, who introduces himself to them as a pupil of Drona.


Arjuna fears that Ekalavya may have eclipsed him in skill with the bow. As a result, Arjuna complains to his teacher Drona, reminding Drona of his promise that he would allow no other pupil to be the equal of Arjuna. Drona acknowledges Arjuna’s claim, and goes with the princes to seek out Ekalavya. He finds him diligently practicing archery. Seeing Drona, Ekalavya prostrates himself and clasps the teacher’s hands, awaiting his order.

Ekalavya practicing having Drona's statue

Ekalavya practicing having Drona’s statue

 

Ekalavya giving gurudakshina

Ekalavya sacrificing his thumb

Ekalavya sacrificing his thumb

Drona asks Ekalavya for a dakshina or deed of gratitude that a student owes his teacher upon the completion of his training. Ekalavya replies that there is nothing he would not give his teacher. Drona cruelly asks for Ekalavya’s right thumb, knowing that its loss will hamper Ekalavya’s ability to pursue archery. Ekalavya, however, cheerfully and without hesitation severs his thumb and hands it to Drona. For his part, Arjuna is relieved to find that the crippled Ekalavya can no longer shoot with his former skill and facility.

End of Ekalavya


Later, Ekalavya worked as a confidant of King Jarasandh. At the time of Rukmini’s swayamvar, he acted as the messenger between Shishupala and Rukmini’s father Bhishmaka, at Jarasandh’s behest. Bhishmaka decides that Rukmini should marry Shishupala, but instead Rukmini elopes with Krishna. Ekalavya is later killed by Krishna, who hurls a rock against him, in a conflict against Jarasandh’s army.

 

Comments

  1. vanderloost says:

    Hullo Ritu!

    I am extremely glad and immensely surprised to have come across your blog which deals with subjects of my interests and inclinations too. In fact the character of Ekalavya attracted me recently not only as the epitome of disciplned self study, dedication and passion but also as a devout disciple whom his Master cruelly ignores and does not give the rightful recognition due to him. A character full of sincerity loyalty and pathos.

    I have written about Ekalavya in my blog too but in a different light.

    I would be extremely happy to receive your comments on the same in case you happen to visit my blog.

    All the best.